The sneaky snake of Rejection by Arhonda Luman

The word rejection is  like a chameleon. chameleon It’s a very sneaky word that can subliminally blend into  unsuspecting places, like the friend button on Facebook or the Tupperware party you were not invited to.  It deliberately sets an ambush, intent on delivering a blow  to one’s psyche, that is comparable to being in a train wreck in the flesh. Rejection has the uncanny ability to  use its fangs to dose its victim with a sense of self worthlessness. That worthlessness spreads like a prolific  vine, that  is dedicated to choke the joy out of life. It can happen so fast, one doesn’t even seeing it coming.
That word is so destructive, it is imperative to learn its habits and how to combat its disparaging nature.
  The first plan of action is to identify it as an enemy,  treat it like the poisonous snake it is and flee from it!rattlesnake
For some reason, it is common for people to entertain rejection and treat that horrible word like it’s their favorite pet. In their pain, they hold it close to their heart. Try to remember, rattlesnakes are not pets! Allowing that sneaky, snaky word of rejection, to set up housekeeping in one’s heart is certain to bring  ruination!
We must free ourselves from  the evil clutches of rejection, by being able to identify it!
There are times, we *feel* rejected when in truth, we are not.
A  toddler might feel rejection when a new baby is brought into a loving family.  (Truth) The toddler is not rejected, he is becoming acquainted with the process of sharing.
 I once knew a teenager who did not practice for tryouts and was not selected to be a cheer leader. She felt rejected and worthless. (Truth)  *She* was not rejected, her level of expertise was. She was exposed to a principle of earning a position by working for it,  however; her beauty and other attributes were still intact. Hopefully she was able to apply that principle to audition better next time.
 Just for kicks, I looked this word up in the Merriam Webster dictionary and was both  pleased and appalled at the definition. rubber stamp of approval
re·ject

Verb:    dismiss as inadequate, inappropriate, or not to one’s taste

Noun:    a person or thing dismissed as failing to meet standards or satisfy tastes:

synonym: loser, incompetent, failure

It has the appearance, if one is actually doing the rejecting, they have the discretion to decide who or what they need for a certain project.  Because someone, who  auditioned to be part of said project,  did not meet the rejecters needs, does not in any capacity, mean the rejected is worthless. I see no evidence to indicate the rejecter has the power or capability to judge the whole identity of a person, nor do I discern the rejecter is even qualified to make  judgements of that magnitude!

In case that was confusing to anyone, here is a couple of prime examples;

I had a customer who bought  a box of costume jewelry at a garage sale. The owner, who *rejected* the jewelry and sold it for nearly nothing, was not able to tell the difference in valuable and invaluable jewelry. (disclaimer: They may have been excellent in many other areas!) My customer bought them for a paltry amount and  took one of the rings to a jeweler to have it appraised. It was worth over $1000.

One last example, a person paid $7.00 for some trinkets at a West Virginia flea market. A painting was included in the lot. She had it appraised because it looked authentic. It was a Renoir worth about $75,000.

Moral to the story,  know one’s own worth,  understand that rejection can be a self improvement tool which is a good thing and consider, the rejecter could possibly be wrong, and even if they are right, it is only for that one occasion! 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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